The Brothers Booth – Archbishops of York

York_Minster_West_Window

West Window of York Minster

The social mobility of the Booths was very impressive. It seems they were not just content with their power base as nobles and gentry and felt it should be more balanced by having  members of this already powerful family build an ecclesiastic power base as well. A few Reverends, an Archdeacon, Bishops and finally two brothers becoming the  Archbishops of York  should help.

Robert Booth (B.1392 D.1460) – was ordained Deacon of York.

Edmund Booth  – Archdeacon of Stow  diocese of Lincoln. (1452-1454)

William Booth – ( D. 1464)                                                                                                           Bishop Of Lichfield , Archbishop of York in 1452 until his death in 1464

Lawrence Booth – (B. abt. 1420 D. 1480)   – brother of William                                          Bishop Of Durham, Lord Chancellor Of England , Archbishop of York

John Booth – a nephew of William & Lawrence, became Bishop of Exeter (1465-78) and Warden of Manchester.

Charles Booth – a great-nephew of William & Lawrence, rose to the Bishop of Hereford (1516-35).

Robert Booth – (B.1662– D.1730) was an Anglican cleric who served in the Church of England as the Archdeacon of Durham (1691–1730) and Dean of Bristol (1708–1730).

Robert Booth was the son of George Booth, 1st Baron Delamer and Lady Elizabeth Grey (daughter of Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford). He was educated at Christ Church, Oxford, graduating from there with a Master of Arts degree and a Doctor of Divinity degree. He married twice, firstly to his distant cousin Ann Booth, who bore him one son, and secondly to Mary Hales, who bore 14 children, the youngest son being Nathaniel Booth, 4th Baron Delamer.

Reverend  Nathaniel Booth – (B. abt. 1683 D. 1734)

Unfortunately no images of these ancestors, however the search never stops.  Also there is more detail to follow.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archbishop_of_York

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